Thursday, February 2, 2017

Ontario Trails News - Trailwise - February 2, 2017

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Bike lanes and hiking trails in Halton Hills

Bike lanes and hiking trails in Halton Hills

Greg Whalin / Flickr Independent Free Press
By Graeme Frisque The Town of Halton Hills outlined its five-year vision for bike lane and hiking trail infrastructure improvements during its regular meeting of council earlier this month.
At its Jan. 16 regular meeting, council received minutes from the Active Transportation Committee meeting held last September, which laid out the committee’s plans for trails and bike lane projects through 2021.
The expansion of Halton Hills’ cycling and trail infrastructure is a long-standing and somewhat organic process encompassing several plans and departments.
According to the town’s trail map, Halton Hills is already home to 22.5 kilometres of municipal hiking trails in addition to the Bruce and Guelph and Radial Line trails, which are part of much larger regional trail systems.
Council has approved a significant investment in 2017 and beyond for improvements, maintenance and additions to its municipal system.
Among trail projects approved for the upcoming year will be the fifth phase of the Halton Hills Village Home Inc. (HHVHI) 13 trail, which will extend the current trail system to Eighth Line. Council has earmarked $203,000 for that project.
Councillor Jane Fogal, who sits as Active Transportation Committee Chair, said council has also approved some surface upgrades from wood chips to limestone screening in certain areas of need.
Staff has also requested $36,000 in funding for the Danville/Wallace Trail to properly construct a link for the partially-formalized trail.
Other trail projects planned over the next five years include trails from Maple Avenue to Guelph Street (2018), Eighth Line to Cedarvale (2019), the Noble Court Line (2020), and the Southeast Georgetown link to Hungry Hallow (2021).
Visit haltonhills.ca/trails/pdf/trailBrochure.pdf for a full map of the existing trail system.
According to Fogal, part of the town’s vision is to build a system which integrates the hiking trails and bike lane systems seamlessly throughout Georgetown and Acton. Part of that plan involves a cycling master plan, which the town adopted in 2010.
“When you’re on a bike you go wherever it’s convenient to go,” said Fogal. “It’s optional, you’ve got choices … people can choose to be on those trails and that’s fantastic.”
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Visit haltonhills.ca/initiatives/cyclingMP.php to view the Cycling Master Plan in its entirety.

Get Kids Walking - Brampton

Step by step, schools push to get kids walking
At Brampton’s Eagle Plains school, a “Walk Whatever the Weather” campaign aims to get as many kids as possible out of the car and onto the sidewalk.
The sighting occurs at 8:15 on a weekday morning in front of Eagle Plains Public School in Brampton. The January air is chilly, the sky slate grey when suddenly it appears — an unusual type of traffic jam.
Not the kind featuring plumes of exhaust and flashing signals, but another phenomenon, seldom seen on suburban streets before the morning bell rings. Could it be a pedestrian rush hour?
People are walking, in twos and threes and big noisy groups. Wrapped in scarves, zipped into puffy jackets. Kids and parents, grandparents and babysitters, collecting friends along the way. Not only that, it’s apparently a daily occurrence at this elementary school of 600.

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Impacts of Trails? Please add the trail layer!

People in Peel drive when they could walk, but don't blame car culture, planners say

Region updating transportation plan in effort to get more people out of their cars

By Kate McGillivray, CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jan 30, 2017 9:35 AM ET
A cyclist walks his bike in an area of Brampton with no bike lanes. The majority of people in the area still opt to drive rather than bike or walk for short trips. A cyclist walks his bike in an area of Brampton with no bike lanes. The majority of people in the area still opt to drive rather than bike or walk for short trips. (Asha Hassan)

Neighbourhood design is making you fat and sick

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(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)
People in Mississauga, Brampton and Caledon are opting to use their cars on shorter trips that could be easily walked or cycled, according to numbers put out by Peel region.
Only 17 per cent of trips under two kilometres, or about 25 minutes on foot, are actually walked. The number is even lower for potential trips by bicycle: 0 per cent take their bikes out for trips under seven kilometres.
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OPP patrol snowmobile trails

DSC_0060OPP Media Release
GREENSTONE – The Greenstone Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) has responded to concerns from the community regarding local snowmobilers. Our trained motorized snow vehicle officers have been patrolling trails, enforcing laws, and promoting safety. The Ministry of Transportation report that every winter about 30 people are killed and another 1,126 are injured while snowmobiling in Ontario.
The Greenstone OPP will continue patrolling the trails of Greenstone and want to remind riders to stay safe and obey the law. These tips will help make you ride safe and avoid charges:
•Obey speed limits and road/trail signs and always drive within your ability. Reduce your speed when driving at night and watch out for fences, guide wires and other objects that are more difficult to spot at night.
•Avoid driving on frozen lakes and rivers. If it can't be avoided, check ice conditions beforehand. Wear a buoyant snowmobile suit. Carry ice picks and make sure they are accessible.
•Tell someone of your outing; including where you are going, the route, description of your snowmobile and your expected time of return.
•Never travel alone… always with a friend. Always be prepared for the unexpected. Carry a fully charged cell phone if available.
•Never drive impaired. Alcohol, illegal drugs, even prescription and some over-the-counter drugs can slow your reaction time and affect your ability to make good decisions.
•If convicted of impaired driving on a snowmobile, you will lose your driving privileges for all types of vehicles, including motor vehicles, commercial vehicles and motorcycles.
•Use appropriate hand signals when driving with others before stopping, slowing down or turning. Exercise caution on corners and hills, and always remain on the right-hand side of the trail.
•Never ride on private property without permission of the landowner.
•Snowmobile operators are obligated to carry documents with them when operating a motorized snow vehicle.
•a valid driver's licence or motorized snow vehicle operator's licence,
•evidence of the vehicle's registration
•proof of insurance - the vehicle must be insured under a motor vehicle liability policy under the Insurance Act
To operate a motorized snow vehicle along a highway a person must be 16 years old and have a valid driver’s license or a motorized snow vehicle operator’s license.
To operate motorized snow vehicle upon a trail, the person must have reached twelve years old and have a motorized snow vehicle operator's license.
If you choose to operate your motorized snow vehicle on property without the owner's permission you could face charges under the Trespass to Property Act as well as Criminal Code charges if you cause damage to that property.
For further information on safe snowmobiling and trails in Ontario please see the Ontario Federation of Snowmobile Clubs (OFSC) at www.ofsc.on.ca


Poll results: Should winter cycling be banned?

“Perhaps you and your bike will provide improved traction for me at the intersection,” Grey Joseph Howler speculated
Jan 26, 2017 3:56 PM by: Ryen Veldhuis
IMG_0239
Cyclists still find themselves out and about, despite the cold weather. Photo by Mike Trahan.With winter seemingly winding down, more cyclists are coming back to the streets to join the growing few who’ve braved the slippery season. However, in a poll BayToday.ca held to the public earlier this month, asking the community if winter cycling should be banned from city streets or not.
This was in response to a winter cycling story published where comments became quite divisive over the controversial issue.
According to the poll, which garnered 1502 votes from the community, 71.7 percent (1077) voted that slushy roads and snow banks make it too dangerous for both cyclists and motorists, while 24.83 percent (373) voted that cyclists have the same right as everyone else to travel the roads.

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Algonquin College Trail Education Program
algonquin on-line education

trail planning program


Trailhead Hastings!



Federal Student Experience Grant FundingThe 2017 Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ) application period for employers is now open.
EXTENDED TO FEB 3, 2017!
Canada Summer Jobs is a Government of Canada initiative. It provides funding for not-for-profit organizations, public sector employers and small businesses with 50 or fewer full-time employees to create summer jobs for students between the ages of 15 and 30.

The application form as well as the applicant guide is currently available at www.canada.ca/canada-summer-jobs. You can submit your application online, by mail or in person at any Service Canada Centre. For a better understanding of the Canada Summer Jobs program including key tips to apply, please watch this YouTube video: https://youtube/SfMoLhkgjU8


Pre-budget Consultation Extended to February 15th!
 Office of the Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance Banner
En Fran├žais
If you have not yet sent in your submission for the 2017 Pre-Budget Consultations, it's not too late!
The date has now been extended to February 15, 2017, we look forward to hearing from you.

Written submissions can be sent to:
The Honourable Charles Sousa
Minister of Finance
c/o Budget Secretariat
Frost Building North, 3rd floor
95 Grosvenor Street
Toronto ON M7A 1Z1

Email: submissions@ontario.ca
Fax: 416-325-0969
If you have any questions, please call toll-free: 1-866-989-9002.

News from Around the Membershipsimcoe mountain bike club

algonquin highlands


January 24 at 8:10pm · Muskoka · I spent a few hours exploring the Scout Valley Loop Trail in Orillia. it was absolutely stunning there! Have any of you been there in winter or another season? curious how it looks without the snow? Post a pic if you have one please!
#camperchristina #snowshoe #snowshoeing #hike #hiking #snow
#trail #hike #hikingtrail #scoutvalley #kustomkayakers #orillia Ultimate Survival Technologies Atlas Snow-Shoe Company KEEN Ontario Snowshoe Trails Ontario Trails Ontario Hiking Trails Ontario Travel
camper christina
Scout Valley Loop Trail – Gorgeous Snowshoeing
I woke up Saturday morning around 6am with nothing planned for the day.  I was just going to relax, catch up on blog posts and maybe watch a few movies.  Unfortunately, my brain was not in agreemen…
CAMPERCHRISTINA.COM

Trailhead Canada - Save the date!

Membership Renewals - Thank-you for your Support!We wish to thank the following organizations that have already completed their membership for 2017. We couldn't do our work without your continued support. Many thanks! Renew Today!

City of Brockvillecity of brockville trails

City of Thunder BayTake an adventure through the backwoods on our amazing trail system. Our trails have something to offer everyone year-round. From hiking to snowmobiling to mountain biking and so much more there is nothing like immersing yourself in nature while having an exhilarating experience. Get out and explore!
Mountain Bike Thunder Bay

join ontario trails"The OTC provides us with the ability to communicate and collaborate with industry stakeholders, professionals and advocates. It also provides us with the tools to develop our own capacities, skills and networks. As well, it is important to back to the OTC and trail communities in our province.
 Being an OTC member allows us to benefit from the knowledge of other members through education and professional development opportunities such as the Trailhead Ontario conference, and through professional networking. The OTC is the influential body that will help guide and shape the political, professional and physical landscape of trails in Ontario. Joining the OTC provides an opportunity to be part of this process: to both contribute and gain knowledge in a community of passionate, like-minded individuals and organizations."
 - Damian Bradley, Cycling advocate and Developer Guelph Regional Trails Council

Membership Benefits
INFORMATION AND FUNDING
  • OTC Trails and Event page representation
  • Representation on OTC trails maps
  • Social Media represents you to 60,000+ people
  • Fund Development through grant writing, grant support
ACCESS AND INFLUENCE
  • Connectivity to the Ministry of Tourism Culture and Sport
  • Leadership at the Ontario Trails Coordinating Committee
  • Office services and networking support
BEST PRACTICES
  • Partnership Support and Knowledge exchange
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TRAIL IMPROVEMENTS
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2017 MEMBERSHIP FORM - PDF     2017 MEMBERSHIP FORM - WORD DOC

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$26.52 + $3.45 = $29.97 (includes 13% HST)
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  • Editions of the OTC newsletter Trailwise
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  • * must provide student verification
$21.21 + $2.75 = $23.96 (includes 13% HST)

Our members include municipalities, conservation authorities, parks,
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and other trail-related supporting organizations.
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